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Showing posts with label Dyslexia. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Dyslexia. Show all posts

Monday, May 14, 2018

How Language Difficulties Impact Math Development




By: Alissa Talamo, Ph. D.
Clinical Neuropsychologist

Did you know research shows that 43-65% of students diagnosed with Dyslexia also struggle with math at a level that meets criteria for a Specific Learning Disability in Math? This is in comparison to the general population, where 5-7 % of the population meet criteria for a Specific Math Disability (Dyscalculia – difficulties with number sense, number facts, or calculations). 

I recently attended a lecture given by Dr. Joanna A. Christodoulou, assistant professor in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at Massachusetts General Hospital and leader of the Brain, Education, and Mind (BEAM) Team in the Center for Health and Rehabilitation Research at MGH. The topic of discussion? How language difficulties can negatively impact math development.

How do language difficulties impact math development?

When asked to learn math, a student with language problems may:
· Have difficulty with the vocabulary of math
· Be confused by language word problems
· Not know when irrelevant information is included or when information is given out of sequence
· Have difficulty understanding directions
· Have difficulty explaining and communicating about math including asking and answering  questions 
· Have difficulty reading texts to direct their own learning
· Have difficulty remembering assigned values or definitions in specific problems

It is helpful to have an understanding of typical math development in children. With this information, a parent can monitor their child’s development relative to grade level expectations.

Math difficulties often looks different at different ages. It becomes more apparent as children get older but symptoms can be observed as early as preschool. Here are some things to look for:

Preschool
· Has trouble learning to count
· Skips over numbers long after kids the same age can remember numbers in the right order
· Struggles to recognize patterns, such as smallest to largest or tallest to shortest
· Has trouble recognizing number symbols (knowing that “7” means seven)
· Unable to demonstrate the meaning of counting. For example, when asked to give you 6 crayons, the child provides a handful, rather than counting out the crayons 

In grades One to Three, a child should:
· Begin to perform simple addition and subtraction computations efficiently
· Master basic math facts (such as 2+3=5)
· Recognize and respond accurately to mathematical signs
· Begin to grasp multiplication (grade 3)
· Understand the concept of measurement and be able to apply this understanding
· Improve their concept of time and money

Clearly, as a child continues through school, demands to understanding abstract math concepts increases. For example, in middle school, a child will be expected to understand concepts such as place value and changing fractions to percentiles, and when in high school, a child will be expected to understand increasingly complex formulas as well as be able to find different approaches to solve the same math problem.

What should I do if I suspect my child has challenges with math?
If you suspect your child is struggling to gain math skills, have your child receive an independent comprehensive evaluation so that you understand your child’s areas of cognitive and learning strengths and weaknesses. This evaluation should also include specific, tailored recommendations to address your child’s learning difficulties.

What if I am not sure whether my child needs a neuropsychological evaluation?
When determining whether an initial neuropsychological evaluation or updated neuropsychological evaluation is needed, parents often choose to start with a consultation. A neuropsychological consultation begins with a review of the child's academic records (e.g., report card, progress reports, prior evaluation reports), followed by a parent meeting, during which concerns and questions are discussed about the child's profile and potential needs. Based on that consultation, the neuropsychologist can offer diagnostic hypotheses and suggestions for next steps, which might include a comprehensive neuropsychological evaluation, work with a transition specialist, or initiation of therapy or tutoring. While a more comprehensive understanding of the child would be gleaned through a full assessment, a consultation is a good place to start when parents need additional help with decision making about first steps.

To book a consultation with Dr. Talamo or one of our many other expert neuropsychologists, complete NESCA's online intake form. Indicate "Consultation" and your preferred clinician in the referral line.

Sources used for this blog:
- Dr. Joanna A. Christodoulou
- www.understood.org 


About the Author 

With NESCA since its inception in 2007,  Dr. Talamo had previously practiced for many years as a child and adolescent clinical psychologist before completing postdoctoral re-training in pediatric neuropsychology at the Children’s Evaluation Center.  

After receiving her undergraduate degree from Columbia University, Dr. Talamo earned her doctorate in clinical health psychology from Ferkauf Graduate School of Psychology and the Albert Einstein College of Medicine at Yeshiva University.

Dr. Talamo specializes in working with children and adolescents with language-based learning disabilities including dyslexia, attentional disorders and emotional issues. She is also interested in working with highly gifted children.

Monday, December 18, 2017

Increasing Reading Success: Early Identification of Reading Challenges



By: Alissa Talamo, Ph.D.
Pediatric Neuropsychologist

I recently attended the International Dyslexia Association Conference in Atlanta, GA (dyslexiaida.org). Among the conference attendees were researchers, teachers, speech-language pathologists, psychologists, and parents of children with dyslexia. One recurring key point was the importance of early identification of reading difficulties, as early provision of appropriate interventions and services leads to better outcomes.

It is important to remember that unlike seeing, hearing, and eating, reading is not something humans do naturally. Reading must be learned and it is not easy (Maryanne Wolf, Proust and the Squid).

As a parent, your early observations are important as there are many developmental indicators that may signal a risk for reading difficulties such as:
  • Experiencing repeated early ear infections
  • History of speech delay and/or pronunciation problems
  • Slow vocabulary growth, frequent difficulty finding the right word, use of less specific words such as “the thing,” “the stuff,” or “that place.”
  • Your child struggles to recognize words that start with the same sound (e.g., cat and car) or end with the same sound (rhyming).
  • Difficulty learning letter and number symbols when in preschool
  • Family history of reading problems

During first grade, you can watch for these warning signs as you listen to your child read aloud:
  • Does not know the sounds associated with all of the letters
  • Skips words in a sentence and does not stop to self-correct
  • Cannot remember words; sounds out the same word every time it occurs on the page
  • Frequently guesses at unknown words rather than sounding them out
  • If you ask your first grader to read aloud to you and he/she is reluctant and avoidant
Remember: 
Early identification of reading issues is extremely important for outcome. If children who have dyslexia receive effective phonological awareness and phonics training in Kindergarten and 1st grade, they will have significantly fewer problems learning to read at grade level than children who are not identified or helped until 3rd grade.

What should I do if I suspect my child has challenges with reading?
If you suspect your child is struggling to learn to read, have your child receive an independent comprehensive evaluation so that you understand your child’s areas of cognitive and learning strengths and weaknesses. This evaluation should also include specific, tailored recommendations to address your child’s learning difficulties.

To learn more about evaluations and testing services with Dr. Talamo and other clinicians at NESCA, you may find the following links helpful:
What if I am not sure whether my child needs a neuropsychological evaluation?
When determining whether an initial neuropsychological evaluation or updated neuropsychological evaluation is needed, parents often choose to start with a consultation. A neuropsychological consultation begins with a review of the child's academic records (e.g., report card, progress reports, prior evaluation reports), followed by a parent meeting, during which concerns and questions are discussed about the child's profile and potential needs. Based on that consultation, the neuropsychologist can offer diagnostic hypotheses and suggestions for next steps, which might include a comprehensive neuropsychological evaluation, work with a transition specialist, or initiation of therapy or tutoring. While a more comprehensive understanding of the child would be gleaned through a full assessment, a consultation is a good place to start when parents need additional help with decision making about first steps. 

To book a consultation with Dr. Talamo or one of our many other expert neuropsychologists, click through and complete NESCA's online intake form. Indicate "Consultation" and your preferred clinician in the referral line.

Sources used for this blog:


With NESCA since its inception in 2007, Dr. Talamo had previously practiced for many years as a child and adolescent clinical psychologist before completing postdoctoral re-training in pediatric neuropsychology at the Children’s Evaluation Center. After receiving her undergraduate degree from Columbia University, Dr. Talamo earned her doctorate in clinical health psychology from Ferkauf Graduate School of Psychology and the Albert Einstein College of Medicine at Yeshiva University. 

Dr. Talamo specializes in working with children and adolescents with language-based learning disabilities including dyslexia, attentional disorders and emotional issues. She is also interested in working with highly gifted children. She has also given a number of presentations, most recently on “How to Recognize a Struggling Reader,” “Supporting Students with Working Memory Limitations,” (with Bonnie Singer, Ph.D., CCC-SLP of Architects for Learning ), and “Executive Function in Elementary and Middle School Students.”

Thursday, March 16, 2017

NESCA Event Today in Derry NH

NESCA and Hartmann Learning Center are pleased to present this free workshop!

Understanding Your Developing Reader: 
How to Identify and Address Reading Challenges in Children

The workshop will address:

  • Developmental expectations and what typical reading development looks like
  • Reasons why children struggle to read
  • Red flags for reading problems
  • What to do when you are concerned about your child’s reading
  • Learning, emotional, and behavioral concerns that can be related to reading challenges
  • How reading challenges are assessed and diagnosed
  • How reading challenges are treated

Presenters:
Dr. Angela M. Currie, Ph.D., Pediatric Neuropsychologist, NESCA
Jill A. Hartmann, M.Ed., S.A.I.F., Hartmann Learning Center

Today!
Thursday March 16, 2017
7:00-8:30pm
Location: 1 ½ Hood Road, Derry, NH 03038

To learn about other NESCA Events check out our Facebook Page and NESCA Event Page!

Monday, February 27, 2017

Assistive Technology Road Trip for Dyslexic Students

Join Learning Ally's Yes! Program Saturday March 4th Workshop on Assistive Technology! 

Come explore Assistive Technology (AT) and learn how it is leveling the playing field for dyslexic students. Experts in the field of the Assistive Technology will be available to demonstrate AT products and answer questions.

YES! Ambassadors will be demonstrating their “go-to”, favorite AT to our attending students. Parents will have the option of attending an information workshop with one of our AT Specialists. This event is suitable for students in third grade and up.

Date: Saturday, March 4

Time: 9:00 A.M - 12:00 P.M.

Location: Chapel Hill Chauncy Hall
379 Lexington St, Waltham, MA 02452
Entrance is at the Green Building attached to the old church building

Registration: 

Guest Speakers:

Courtney Rose Dykeman-Bermingham provides Transition Assessments and Assistive Technology consulting and training at Neuropsychology & Education for Children & Adolescents (NESCA), a pediatric neuropsychology practice with offices in Newton, MA and Londonderry, NH.

Karen Janowski Adjunct Professor, Graduate School of Education, Simmons College; Assistive & Educational Technology Consultant, EdTech Solutions

For More Details: